Pages Menu
Categories Menu

Posted by on Mar 13, 2017 in Caregivers & Legacy, Designated Daughter, Smart Women Tips, Wills & Estate Planning | 0 comments

Smart Women Tip:  The Time to Prepare for Caregiving is Now!

Smart Women Tip: The Time to Prepare for Caregiving is Now!

Rosalyn Carter eloquently stated:

“There are only 4 types of people: those who have been caregivers, those who are caregivers, those who receive care, and those who will be caregivers in the future!

  • How many children are really prepared for that phone call from one of their parents or loved ones that will turn their lives upside down?
  • If you are the parent, are you prepared and have you talked with your children about your wishes if something should happen to you and you need assistance?

The secret is to be prepared so when a triggering event should happen, you will feel confident for making decisions and everyone involved will understand what’s expected.

Read More

Posted by on Jan 27, 2017 in Caregivers & Legacy, Contributing Expert, Designated Daughter, Enlightenment, Get Inspired, Inspirational Audio & Video, Love & Happiness, Mind, Body & Spirit, Mindset, Movie Reviews | 0 comments

‘Things to Come’ extols the joys of liberation

‘Things to Come’ extols the joys of liberation

“Things to Come” (“L’avenir”) (2016). Cast: Isabelle Huppert, André Marcon, Roman Kolinka, Edith Scob, Sarah Le Picard, Solal Forte, Elise Lhomeau, Daniel Dray-Rabotnik, Guy-Patrick Sainderichen, Yves Heck, Rachel Arditi. Director: Mia Hansen-Løve. Screenplay: Mia Hansen-Løve. Web site. Trailer.

Having it made is something we all crave, right? The prospects of all of our material, vocational and emotional needs being met probably has tremendous appeal for most of us. But what happens when what we thought we wanted becomes a trap that keeps us from exploring other options? We may come to feel stifled, restricted and unfulfilled. But what do we do about it? Those are the questions raised in the thought-provoking new French melodrama, “Things to Come” (“L’avenir”).

Read More

Posted by on Dec 16, 2013 in Caregivers & Legacy, Designated Daughter, Wills & Estate Planning | 0 comments

Five Steps to Help You Prepare for That Call in the Night

Five Steps to Help You Prepare for That Call in the Night

Seniors woman with her caregiver at homeAs women, we are often expected to fill multiple roles: that of loving mother, career woman, supportive wife or partner and for many, a new role – that of a caregiver to our parents or loved ones. For the last 20 years, I have helped clients plan for their “golden years” and how they will address the issues of aging and remaining independent.

Here are the five steps that you can take now to get prepared:

Step 1 – Get Organized.

Before attempting to discuss financial, tax and estate planning issues with your loved ones, be sure to sit down with a financial advisor and get your own life plan in order.

Step 2 – Initiate “The Discovery Conversation” with Your Loved Ones. O

ne way to initiate this conversation with your loved ones is to ask them what they would do if something happened to you. Do they know who your advisors are, where your documents are, your doctors, etc? This may help lead the conversation into what your role would be for them. Are you needed as a care giver, a trustee, a personal representative and who else would be involved? Knowing this up front, will help you plan for your own future.

Step 3 – Start Planning as Early as Possible.

Don’t wait until the unexpected happens. It’s never too early to start planning for the unexpected. Meeting with an attorney, financial planner and insurance agent to create the proper planning may be all it takes to make sure your needs are met. Planning early when your have the most options makes sense – being proactive rather than reactive.

Step 4 – Consider Purchasing Long Term Care Insurance.

Start the conversation when your parents or loved ones are young and healthy and then suggest that they apply for long term care insurance as early as possible. We are living much longer and the need for healthcare and related services is exploding. In fact, seriously consider purchasing your own policy now while YOU are still healthy and the premiums are affordable!

Step 5 – Create a Team of Trusted Advisors.

This is not the time for-do-it-yourself-planning. Find a “key advisor” who is an eldercare expert and have this individual manage the team with you based on your loved ones goals, values and objectives. The final product should enable your loved ones to maintain their dignity, lifestyle and assets. It should also meet the needs of the caregiver. The end result; everyone involved should be able to sleep better at night knowing all concerns have been addressed and that a team and a plan is in place to meet the unexpected.

 

 

Katana Abbott is a certified financial planner who built a $100 million investment management and financial planning practice over 20 years and recently retired to follow her dream – The Designated Daughter Program™ and Smart Women’s Coaching™. Visit http://www.smartwomenscoaching.com/ to sign up for her monthly newsletter and be invited to events, workshops and tele-classes.

 

 

 

Read More

Posted by on Feb 2, 2010 in Caregivers & Legacy, Contributing Expert, Designated Daughter, Mind, Body & Spirit, Mindset | 0 comments

Hospice, Funerals, Cremation and Saying Goodbye

Hospice, Funerals, Cremation and Saying Goodbye

My Godmother, Dad, Uncle George (poet) us kid in Italy 1960

My Godmother, Dad, Uncle George (poet) us kid in Italy 1960

My mother was diagnosed with Dementia in May 2006 while my step-father was dying of lung cancer.  Hospice was our saving grace.  I had no idea how wonderful their support and advise would be during Dad’s last few months of death.  He died on my birthday, October 24, 2006.

My mother lived at Sunrise Assisted Living and enjoyed her life very much.  In fact, I just received a copy of the last letter her friend, Norio, of Japan received from her.  Here is a quote from her note, “I don’t have much to say since I don’t do anything except play cards anymore.  I hope you are enjoying every day of life.  I sure am.”

On December 8th, 2009, Hospice was called in to help my mother since her health had deteriated so bad.  I knew the routine and went through mourning on my way home from her place that day.  Between Hospice and Sunrise her last month was very pleasant and I enjoyed every moment with her.  She passed away peacefully on Thursday, January 14th.  I had a traditional funeral with a cremation immediately following the service.  I was told that 50% of families are now choosing cremation.

Since my mom’s name is Rose, I am planting a gorgeous Rose Garden with her ashes this spring right in the middle of our circular brick paver drive.  There is a huge stone there already, so I will have it inscribed with her name.

After the service, my loved ones and I had the pleasure of going through the dozens of photo albums, scrapbooks, and letters she and my father exchanged when he first went into the army.  I also came across a stack of poems written by my godmother’s husband, George Richardson, a distinquished poet and one of her best friends since high school.  I would like to share it with you now…I promise you will read it twice and it will bring tears to your eyes…

My dear I lay awake last nigh
Till you were by my side –
The lights were out, the dog was gone
My God I almost cried
I heard your voice as you came in
The first time late for bed –
I thought at first it may bave been
Just something I had said
Twas then I made my mind up dear
I’d be a better mate –
And rid myself of all the doubt
The years of jealous hate
And as you stood beside my love
The scent, it filled the room –
So like the smell that meant so much
When we first bride and groom
The song you picked to play that night
My eyes I kept them shut –
How wrong I’d been through all these years
Within my stubborn rut
I tried to raise my hand to you
With ring that we had wed-
But that’s when you apologized
For all that you had said
I guess that’s when I first felt good
Our friends were all around –
I knew I couldn’t reach you now
And Where that I was bound
The kiss you placed upon my lips
AS though it dealt by fate –
Within my coffin I did lay
Your kiss was two days late

~George Richardson

 

katana crtKatana helps women ages 43-60 create lives of abundance, joy and financial freedom while following their passions.  She is a Certified Financial Planner and Caregiving Expert.  You can contact her at katana@designateddaughter.com
Read more here:
Hospice, Funerals, Cremation and Saying Goodbye

Read More

Posted by on Jan 12, 2010 in Caregivers & Legacy, Designated Daughter | 0 comments

Hospice offers a helping hand:  Saying Goodbye to Mom

Hospice offers a helping hand: Saying Goodbye to Mom

Mom’s art show at Sunrise Assisted Living My mother has been in Hospice since the first of December.  She suffers from Dementia which is a brain disease.  I just got off the phone with a relative, and he couldn’t understand why Dementia is causing her decline since is seems like a simple brain or memory loss issue.  It’s not though.  Since she was diagnosed, she has slowly been declining in all areas of her life. I remember taking her to Fitness 19 to work with a trainer last year, and she told me that mom’s muscles were no longer firing…and she just could not seem to get the rhythm of the treadmill together. Last summer, she was still taking long walks with me and working in the garden and even playing pool with my husband when she began to experience a serious decline.  It may have been the change in her medications after her last visit to the neurologist…I have racked my brain over this.

Read more here:
Hospice offers a helping hand: Saying Goodbye to Mom

Read More

Posted by on Dec 16, 2009 in Caregivers & Legacy, Designated Daughter | 0 comments

Meeting with Hospice

Meeting with Hospice

On Monday this week, Seasons Hospice came to my home to complete the paperwork to have my mom entered into their Hospice program.  Although I used Hospice for my step father in 2006, I received a new insight from this meeting. These are the most wonderful and kind folks and they offer such an amazing service.  I remember when the doctor recommended Hospice for my step father when he was diagnosed with lung cancer at 86, I actually got mad thinking “I wasn’t going to let him die”.  So I held off contacting them until it was really ‘urgent’ that we get some help. Had I known how much support, education and services they offer, I would have been grateful to call them for my step father and then received support and guidance for the last full year of his life. My mom is now in the last stages of her disease (Dementia) and is no longer walking, transferring or able to feed herself.  She is on oxygen and they have just started morphine for pain.  She is becoming very “stiff” it seems and it’s hard for her to move anymore. Yesterday, my daughters and I spent time together with her going through one of her photo albums that documented her pictures during her school years, plus all her class reunions.  She has created over 40 photo albums and has documented every event during her life.  This is a wonderful gift she is leaving all of us. I am so glad that we took care of all her planning years ago by creating wills, trusts, power of attorney and long term care insurance for her and dad back when there were lots of options.  This has allowed me to focus on mom and dad’s quality of life and quality of care these last couple of years. Feel free to download the free Caregiver’s Manual that I created to help you prepare for caring for your loved ones.  I have used this process for years working with hundreds of clients and thank goodness I followed this process with my folks to.  It’s been a blessing.  I am off to help mom with her dinner.  Take care.   If you have questions about caregiving, financial planning or estate planning, please feel free to contact me at katana@designateddaughter.com

Read more here:
Meeting with Hospice

Read More

Posted by on Dec 10, 2009 in Caregivers & Legacy, Designated Daughter | 0 comments

Caregivers and When to Bring in Hospice?

Caregivers and When to Bring in Hospice?

Thanksgiving with mom

Thanksgiving with mom

What do you do when the doctor recommends calling Hospice for your loved one?  After visiting my mom on Thanksgiving and watching her finish her entire dinner, it was shocking to visit her just a week later to find her on oxygen.  My daughters were in tears as we played a couple hands of rummy with her while I held her cards and played for her.  Just weeks ago, she had been able to play independently…plus she actually beat me at a few hands.  How does this happen so quickly?  I called her doctor, and he recommended that we contact Hospice for a consultation.

I am very familiar with Hospice.  My step-father was diagnosed with lung cancer at 86 in October 2005.  We managed to keep dad healthy and enjoying life (beating all odd, the doctor said) and finally called in Hospice in June.  Hospice was our saving grace until he died on October 24, 2006 on my birthday.  I love Hospice.  I’ll share that story with you one day…now back to mom.

Yesterday, I surprised mom on her birthday.  She is just 76 and suffering from dementia and a series of unexpected falls that have caused this sudden change in health.  She was very excited to see me with her gift and cards in hand.  She was just finishing up with her last therapy session that was related to her hospital stay and subsequent rehab stay at Fox Run.  It gets complicated, doesn’t it?

I have been crying on and off every day and feeling this pit inside my stomach since I realized that my mom really is declining.  I have been asking myself did we do all that we could have, did I choose the right doctors, what chould I have done differently?  It’s funny how we do this to ourselves.  I am sure I am not alone with these types of feelings, right?

When I look into my mom’s eyes now she seems to be telling me all is fine and she is ready to go and be with Dale (my step father), and her mom, dad, bothers, and Aunt Madge.  She smiles all the time and is just happy to be with me and grateful for the moments of time we have together right now.

I am calling Hospice tomorrow as her doctor has recommended.  It seems so final, but I know it’s the right thing to do.  What are your feelings about Hospice?  Thank you for your support right now…and I send my love to all of those who are going through this same process right now.  Feel free to share your thoughts…

Share/Bookmark

Read more here:
Caregivers and When to Bring in Hospice?

Read More

Posted by on Nov 30, 2009 in Caregivers & Legacy, Designated Daughter | 0 comments

Caregiving:  Words of Wisdom

Caregiving: Words of Wisdom

Meredith BromfieldI am joining Katana and the Designated Daughter team of caregiving and legacy experts.  Each week, I will be posting my Words of Wisdom column and hope you enjoy it.  Each post will focus on a quote, my words of inspiration and an action you may take.  Our theme the month of November is “Forgiveness”.  You are invited to sign up to receive these WOWs in your email box by signing up for our RSS feed.  Thank you!

QUOTE:

“Unease, anxiety, tension, stress, worry – all forms of fear – are cause by too much future, and not enough presence. Guilt, regret, resentment, grievances, sadness, bitterness, and all forms of nonforgiveness are caused by too much past, and not enough presence.”

-Eckhart Tolle 

INSPIRATION: 

When you live in the future you are strapped with the fear of the unknown and don’t live today. When you hang on to stuff from your past and don’t let go, you again are not living today. For each day that you choose to live in the future or in the past you lose the most precious gift of today.  Life is too short and too precious to not enjoy it and live it. You get only one shot at life – it has been said this is not a dress rehearsal and you don’t get a “do over” – all you have is today. Don’t lose it because you are stuck in the past or are living in tomorrow. Today is a gift, treasure it, savor it, enjoy it, and share it because quite frankly this is all you get!

ACTION:

Purpose to live today. When you get up in the morning focus only on what is needed for today. Take captive every thought that either drags you into the past or pushes you into the future. When these thoughts come ask yourself… Is this something I can do today?  The answer will either be yes or no.  If your answer is yes, then ask yourself what you can do and then do it. If your answer is no then write it down on a piece of paper and stick it into a file that says “God’s pile” – it is no longer mine to deal with.  If it is something that brings you into the future the same rules apply. By the way, I don’t mess with “God’s pile” — it’s not mine anymore. I get to live today and enjoy it free from the mess of the past or the fear of tomorrow. 

To learn more about my programs on creating a legacy, visit www.CrossingYourBridge.net  

Share/Bookmark

Read more here:
Caregiving: Words of Wisdom

Read More

Posted by on Nov 26, 2009 in Caregivers & Legacy, Designated Daughter | 1 comment

Caregiving and Gratitude

Caregiving and Gratitude

Yesterday I visited my mother at Sunrise Assisted Living.  She had just moved over to their Reminiscence – dementia section.  At first I was worried that she would not like it, but after visiting, I found that the homey setting which resembles a very large open kitchen, dinning and living area was perfect for individuals at this level of need.

Mother's Day with Mom in Chicago

About six weeks ago, my mom had a short stay in the hospital and than spent three weeks in rehab at Fox Run, an Ericson Facility, my mother spent her days in bed, often in a hospital gown.  Although their nurses and care was excellent, my mom was bored and sleep most of the time.  At Sunrise, she is up and dressed, her hair and nails are done every Thursday.  They even gave her a pedicure.

I visited mom yesterday, and she looked beautiful…she could not get the smile off her face.  She loves her new room and we even played a game of cards.  It’s amazing how lucid she was after my experience last week when she barely recognized me.

Today while I was preparing turkey dinner, my brother ran over to see mom and had a Thanksgiving lunch with her.  I even received a call from her nurse giving me an update on her condition.  She said mom would not be able to travel to our home today, but she was doing much better after the “house call” from the Sunrise physician.

My heart goes out to all these wonderful caregivers.  Thankyou for giving your lives in the service of others so our loved ones can maintain their dignity and quality of life.

Reminiscence

Share/Bookmark

Read more here:
Caregiving and Gratitude

Read More

Posted by on Nov 24, 2009 in Caregivers & Legacy, Designated Daughter | 0 comments

Caregiving Dilemma:  dehydration, over medication or what?

Caregiving Dilemma: dehydration, over medication or what?

As a caregiver to my mom, I am forced with a huge dilemma right now.  A week ago, I went to visit my mom at Sunrises Assisted Living.  She was still in bed at 10 am.  Recently, she has been wanting to sleep.  She was excited to see me when I woke her up, so I helped her with her shower, and then helped her get dressed.  I was shocked to see how much she deteriorated in her abilities to manage on her own and it puzzled me.

Mom and DadMom and Dad

 

How could my mom be experiencing such huge changes in her physcial and mental abilities so quickly and what could I do about it.  I decided to spend a few hours with her to see how she was managing her daily activities.

I took her to the dinning room and asked the chef to prepare scrambled eggs, toast, OJ and coffee.  When it came out, not only was it delicious, but I was thrilled too see my mom devour every last bite.  She had no problem managing her breakfast independently and we had a great time together.

Next, I invited her to play rummy and she was thrilled.  We started playing in the bistro, and soon we had a full table of other players.  Mom played quite well.  The only issue was that I had to remind here when it was her turn.

One week later, last Saturday evening, I stopped over to say goodnight and to my horror, my mother was in here wheel chair, looking off into space with a dazed look.  She did not recognize me, and could not speak or move her legs.  What was going on?  I pulled out one of her photo albums, and began to show her pictures asking her who these people were.  When I showed her a picture of herself, she replied, “Mum-ma”, like a talking doll.  When I asked her to identify her recently deceased husband — my stepfather –she  replied, “Pa-pa”.

I called the attendants in to help my mom to bed…and left in tears.  What was going on?  One thing I noticed is that my mother seemed very dehydrated, so I called the nurse and requested that they monitor her food andn water intake and make sure she is given water regularly with a straw as if she was in a hospital.

I noticed that she even had a problem swallowing the water and pills that night…and I was told that she has lost interest in eating.

What does a daughter do at this point?  What do you do when a loved one is unable or unwilling to feed themselves and begins to refuses food?

Please share your stories and experiences with me for my upcoming book with co-author and Legacy Expert, Meredith Bromfield called, The Designated Daughter:  Caregiving and Legacy Planning.   Thank you.

Share/Bookmark

Read more here:
Caregiving Dilemma: dehydration, over medication or what?

Read More

Posted by on Aug 12, 2009 in Caregivers & Legacy, Designated Daughter | 0 comments

A Legacy of Tulips

A Legacy of Tulips

by Steve Pender, video biographer & personal historian, Family Legacy Video, Inc.
Did you ever play Wiffle Ball? Growing up, it was the summer pastime of choice in my suburban New Jersey neighborhood. Every day, kids would congregate on the side street by my house, choose sides and have at it. Games were noisy affairs, punctuated by lots of arguments over close calls, and could last for hours. It wasn’t unusual for us to suspend a game for dinner and then reconvene afterwards. In fact, I remember finishing one game under the glare of a neighbor’s headlights.

It was a pretty safe game, too, thanks to the hollow plastic Wiffle Ball. It would glance harmlessly off just about anything it hit.

The exception was Mr. Daly’s tulips.

Mr. and Mrs. Daly lived on the other side of the street. They were a very pleasant, elderly couple and they tolerated us kids pretty well. Unfortunately, Mr. Daly insisted on planting tulips outside the chain link fence bordering his backyard. He was quite proud of those tulips and the bright red and yellow blooms they provided each spring – and he became quite upset whenever a sharply hit foul ball lopped the top off one of them. Or two. Or three. Not that we wanted to damage the flowers; they were just innocent bystanders that occasionally got caught in our Wiffle Ball crossfire.

The 1960s, as well as Mr. and Mrs. Daly, are long gone. But a recent experience brought all those memories back to me. In early July, my wife Halina and I traveled back to New Jersey to visit family. One day, we drove through my old neighborhood. I couldn’t resist stopping to look at my old house, now vastly enlarged from the little bungalow in which I grew up. I walked around the house and took a few pictures – and it wasn’t long before I caught the attention of one of the neighbors, who probably figured I was casing the place for a robbery.

He strolled over, a glass of beer in hand, and asked if I needed some help. I introduced myself and told him I grew up in the neighborhood. We started chatting, and soon I found myself in the middle of a small crowd of neighbors, answering questions about what things were like in the old days, and who used to live where. During the course of our chat, I mentioned our Wiffle Ball games and the many tulips we beheaded.

Finally, the time came to say goodbye. As I was about to leave, the neighbor currently living in the Daly’s old house said, “You know, I’m glad you mentioned about the tulips. They keep sprouting up and I had no idea where they came from.”

As Halina and I drove away, the thought of those tulips – Mr. Daly’s legacy to the neighborhood – filled me with a warm glow. The experience reminded me that legacies can take many forms, be they video biographies or tulips – and that they enrich and inform the lives of the generations that follow.

Nice job, Mr. Daly.

Read More

Posted by on Aug 3, 2009 in Caregivers & Legacy, Designated Daughter | 0 comments

Family Legacy in Poetry

Family Legacy in Poetry

by Steve Pender, video biographer & personal historian, Family Legacy Video, Inc.

Several years ago, my local paper, the Arizona Daily Star, published a wonderful poem by a poet named Andrei Guruianu that relates to family history in a very personal way. The poem really resonates with me; I hope you enjoy it.

Grandfather
by Andrei Guruianu

Dead before I came into this world, grandfather,
I carry your name, yet I’ve never met you.
I hear my name, and know
that somehow they refer to you.
When I scribble those six letters
fast, to sign some document
or print them neatly in a box,
I feel your presence flow with the ink
stain and burn through the paper,
forever imprinted in my mind.
Late summer nights
gathered around the dinner table,
leftovers being cleared away,
faces clouded in cigarette smoke,
I hear voices pass the word
back and forth in reverence.
Somehow I know it’s not me
the little one grabbing for attention.
They speak of you, Andrei,
the one I’ve never met,
whose name I carry.

Read More

Posted by on Sep 30, 2008 in Caregivers & Legacy, Designated Daughter | 0 comments

Caregiving and Aging

As you know, I have been a caregiver to my parents. I am thankful I was able to communicate early with my folks, in fact, 15 years ago we had the conversation and I am able to enjoy time with my mother, without the stress of being the day-to-day caregiver. She lives at Sunrise Assisted Living 10 minutes away and is enjoying her security and comfort brought on by good planning. The planning we did as a family has allowed her to have plenty of income and security for the rest of her life. It also allows me to follow my dreams of writing, speaking and traveling. If you want to learn how to be prepared for caregiving with your loved ones, please feel free to visit www.DesignatedDaughter.com and download your free copy of our Caregiver’s Manual which will take you through the steps I took 15 years ago, as well as our Designated Daughter ezine. No matter where you are in the process there is a plan and help that’s perfect for you and your loved ones caregiving needs. Please let us know how we can support you. If you are a caregiver for a loved one, please be part of our survey and tell us, “What is the single biggest challenge you are facing today as a caregiver?” You can submit your response simply by filling in the comment box below under “Leave a Reply”. We also would like to hear your questions on our blog.

Read More

Posted by on Sep 30, 2008 in Caregivers & Legacy, Designated Daughter | 0 comments

When Parents Need Caregiving: How to Prepare for that Call in the Night

As women, we are often expected to fill multiple roles: loving mother, career woman, supportive wife or partner and for many, a new role – that of a caregiver to aging parents or disabled loved ones. For the last 20 years, I have helped clients create financial plans for their “golden years,” and address issues of aging and remaining independent.

We all dread the idea of that “call in the night” – the one that means we must step into the “Designated Daughter” role, manage our parent’s lives and make tough decisions about their care and welfare. But for many of us, that call will come, and it pays to have everything in place in advance. Here are five steps that you can take now to get prepared:

Step 1 – Get Organized
Before attempting to discuss financial, tax and estate planning issues with your loved ones, be sure to sit down with a financial advisor and get your own life plan in order.

Step 2 – Initiate “The Discovery Conversation” with Your Loved Ones
One way to initiate this conversation is to ask them what they would do if something happened to you. Do they know the names and contact information of your advisors? Your doctors? Do they know where to find documents such as your will, or medical forms? This may help lead the conversation into what your role would be for them. Are you needed as a caregiver, a trustee, or a personal representative? Who else might be involved? Knowing this up front will help you plan for your own future.

Step 3 – Start Planning as Early as Possible Don’t wait until the unexpected happens. It’s never too early to start planning for the unexpected. Meeting with an attorney, financial planner and insurance agent to create the proper planning may be all it takes to make sure your needs are met. Planning early when your have the most options makes sense – being proactive rather than reactive. Step 4 – Consider Purchasing Long Term Care Insurance
Start the conversation when your parents or loved ones are young and healthy and then suggest that they apply for long term care insurance as early as possible. We are living much longer and the need for healthcare and related services is exploding. In fact, seriously consider purchasing your own policy now while you are still healthy and the premiums are affordable!

Step 5 – Create a Team of Trusted Advisors This is not the time for-do-it-yourself-planning. Find a “key advisor” who is an eldercare expert and have them manage the team with you based on your loved ones goals, values and objectives. The final product should enable your loved ones to maintain their dignity, lifestyle and assets. It should also meet the needs of the caregiver. The end result: everyone involved should be able to sleep better at night knowing all concerns have been addressed and that a team and a plan is in place to meet the unexpected.


Katana Abbott is currently writing, “Secrets from a Midlife Millionaire – Create Your Perfect Life”. After a 20-year career, she left her $100 million investment management and financial planning practice to follow her dream of helping women find their passion, be financially aware and prepared, have access to the right resources and meet some of the top business-building experts in the country. Visit www.smartwomenscoaching.com to sign up for her free 7-part audio mini course, “Your Perfect Life Focus” and to access her other programs!

Read More

When was the last time you were inspired?

Sign up now for our Weekly Ezine, Radio Show Invitations, PLUS, 100 days of Inspiration!

Name
Email

You have Successfully Subscribed!